Are We Seeing the End of Sneaker Bots and Proxies?

Now many people who come to this site are looking for proxies for a specific purpose. It could be to keep their Instagram empire running, managing multiple accounts means lots of IP addresses. Others are working the other big social networks and need multiple digital identities to manage those.

Sneaker Bots and Proxies

Yet more and more people are making their living online using an arbitrage method – buying and selling items online for profit. The concept is simple and can actually work in thousands of markets if you have the persistence and ingenuity to exploit them. It’s simply the digital version of ordinary commerce, buying from one source and selling (hopefully at a profit) to another. Obviously these markets need to be separate in some way, however this model offers the opportunity to make a good living simply by sitting at your computer.

There are millions of people on sites like eBay and Craigslist who do this every day. However there are certain markets where there’s huge profits and markups possible and one of these is the so called ‘premium sneaker market.

Here’s an excerpt of an interesting article from GQ magazine.

Around the time that dedicated collectors started pitching tents outside sneakers stores, winding so far down the block that police sometimes felt it necessary to shut the whole thing down, sneakers stopped being something we just put on our feet. In the last few decades, and especially the last five years, sneakers have become something else entirely: sought-after commodities that bring immediate returns to a buyer. They’re lottery tickets—and, as in actual lotteries, people have discovered ways to work the system to their favor. “Bots”—computer programs that can work their way to e-commerce checkouts faster than any human—are the most popular hack.

They’re also a great source of frustration for retailers, who prefer to sell sneakers to customers who won’t immediately flip them to the highest bidder—your local shoe store, after all, doesn’t get a dime of that increased resale price. Recently, though, retailers have been taking stronger measures to combat the phenomenon. The situation came to a head this month when the drop of several hyped shoes, like the Fear of God x Nike, the “Not for Resale” Jordan, and the Nike SB x Concepts “Purple Lobster,” coincided with the growing anger at the non-humans snapping them up. That’s how someone ended up paying $10,000 for sneaker that almost certainly won’t fetch that price on the aftermarket.

The huge and simple profits are largely gone now, but you can still make lots of money buying and reselling sneakers online. The complexity is the various barriers which the company are putting people buying and reselling their products. No longer can you just set up a bunch of accounts and buy loads of sneakers with a simple Bot or just a load of laptops open simultaneously. You need specialist proxies specifically designed for buying sneakers like these.

There are other counter measures involved now which can take some time, effort and investment to bypass.  Many are suggesting that it’s just too difficult now, yet I still know many people that are making fortunes from carrying on in this market.  Sure they spend more effort setting stuff up, configuring their bots and buying specific proxies which rotate their IP addresses. Yet as the market gets more difficult, then it also become less crowded and those who can bypass the company’s blocks will find the market less saturated.

It does take more work and more investment, but don’t imagine the days of the sneaker buyers are gone. Just have a look at eBay listings for your favorite shoes and check out the prices, these guys are still making money!

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